THE ANCIENT PERSPECTIVE ON WOMEN

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Jesus disciples asked him, “why are you wasting your time talking to a woman?  She can’t even get into heaven unless she is married and pleases her husband.”  Jesus didn’t contest this, “I will turn her into a man!”

Why couldn’t women get into heaven?  Because they don’t have souls, which is to say they are not philosophers an are not capable of remaining consistently rational and letting their philosophy inform their behavior.  Kosher law was aware of psychology before it existed, in a lot of ways the ancients were smarter about people.  Part of the reason women were “unclean” on their menses is because of their emotions going haywire.  it is the same reason why when Israel was a warring tribe if you killed someone in battle you had to sit shiva for seven days before entering the city, because of post traumatic stress.

Buddha said to his disciples, “Now that you have forced me to make women part of my religion it will only be around in it’s uncorrupted state for 300 years.”

From the perspective of the ancients women are the complement and men are the supplement.  This was a reference to the idea that the soul splits itself when it incarnates.

Aristotle, ” A friend is one soul in two bodies.”

Aristotle was making reference to his concept of a philoish, a philosophical brother, but he was using it in the vein of the soul.  In a way it represents extrinsic memory in the form of relationship.

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This was also a reference to a mathematical concept.  Women are the complement because they rely on men to contribute more than they themselves are capable of creating.  Women presuppose a pleasant environment, the oikos, the house, the economy,  and they run the house and they pay the wages and they keep the cellars stocked with wine and they keep the slaves in line and they should confine their judgments and attention to that arena since they are not capable of dealing with the ugliness in the world and making sacrifices and hard choices that are unpleasant on a grand external scale, feminine attention is turned inward, male attention is turned outward, the poli, the police, the policy, the politics.  think about nesting rituals in evolutionary psychology.  The man creates a nest, a surplus to attract a female which makes her feel comfortable that she and her children will be well provided for.

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Women presuppose a pleasant environment and a pleasant environment is not a natural environment, it has to be made pleasant for them by a man.  Nature is not pleasant, the ocean is not pleasant, outer space is not pleasant, grizzly bears are not pleasant.  So if women need pleasantness they should confine their attention and judgments to environments that are pleasant, instead of castrating their men so that they can’t defend them.

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The ancient Greeks found feminine behavior so bizarre that they explained their actions and emotions with hysteria.  They thought that a woman’s uterus moved around in their body causing them to be insane and emotional giving them humors.

In the middle of the flanks of women lies the womb, a female viscus, closely resembling an animal; for it is moved of itself hither and thither in the flanks, also upwards in a direct line to below the cartilage of the thorax, and also obliquely to the right or to the left, either to the liver or the spleen, and it likewise is subject to prolapsus downwards, and in a word, it is altogether erratic. It delights also in fragrant smells, and advances towards them; and it has an aversion to fetid smells, and flees from them; and, on the whole, the womb is like an animal within an animal.  ~Plato

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Women and men were separated in the ancient world not to protect women from men but to protect masculinity from femininity.  So that men could think clearly and philosophically and rationally and defend the polis from it’s enemies.  So that they could work out and train and make themselves smart and strong.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Female_hysteria

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