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The Origin of the Western Philosophical System

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So my theory which I feel confident will stand up to the criticism of science, haplo-groups and what have you is that essentially our entire western system of philosophy, religion, logic, science, every structure of legitimate authority comes from the Aghori cult of India.  Even the words that we use still hearken back to that ancient philosophical cult, that predated the Greek culture, the cult of the Augure’s.  I am not making this up, it is a known fact, you may not know it but that doesn’t make it any less true.  

In ancient RomeAuctoritas referred to the general level of prestige a person had in Roman society, and, as a consequence, his clout, influence, and ability to rally support around his will. Auctoritas was not merely political, however; it had a numinous content and symbolized the mysterious “power of command” of heroic Roman figures. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auctoritas

28When Jesus had finished saying these things, the crowds were amazed at his teaching, 29because he taught as one who had authority, and not as their teachers of the law.  Matthew 7

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http://www.cornell.edu/video/the-spirit-of-roman-law

I am a linguistic philosopher and a philologist, and I started noticing patterns in words that were related to one another or had similar or conjunct definitions.  This particular grouping of words is most meaningful because not only did it create the philosophy of reason and logic it created the philosophy behind all of the western structures of authority including science.  

The Aghori (Sanskritअघोर aghōra),[2] are ascetic Shaiva sadhus.

The Aghori are known to engage in post-mortem rituals. They often dwell in charnel grounds, have been witnessed smearing cremation ashes on their bodies, and have been known to use bones from human corpses for crafting skull bowls (which Shiva and other Hindu deities are often iconically depicted holding or using) and jewelry. Due to their practices that are contradictory to orthodox Hinduism, they are generally opposed.[3][4]

Pythagorus, name meant, “I am the Python”  and since the Python was a chthonic symbol (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chthonic) what he was saying was, “I am death.”  Jesus was similarly transliterated, when he said I am Adonai Sabaoth, he wasn’t saying that he was the lord of the Sabbath, he was saying he was the god of death.  

Reason

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Reason is the capacity for consciously making sense of things, applying logic, for establishing and verifying facts, and changing or justifying practices, institutions, and beliefs based on new or existing information.[1] It is closely associated with such characteristically human activities as philosophysciencelanguage,mathematics, and art, and is normally considered to be a definitive characteristic of human nature.[2] The concept of reason is sometimes referred to as rationalityand sometimes as discursive reason, in opposition to intuitive reason.[3]

Reason or “reasoning” is associated with thinkingcognition, and intellect. Reason, like habit or intuition, is one of the ways by which thinking comes from one idea to a related idea. For example, it is the means by which rational beings understand themselves to think about cause and effecttruth and falsehood, and what is good or bad. It is also closely identified with the ability to self-consciously change beliefsattitudestraditions, and institutions, and therefore with the capacity for freedom and self-determination.[4]

According to Professor emeritus Okko Behrands, Octavian chose between one of two names, Romulus the first king of Rome, and Augustus the high priest of the cult of the Augure’s.  You will notice that we have 2 invasive months in our calendar, Julius and Augustus, the two roman rulers that marked the middle of the Pax Romana.  Furthermore, it threw off the numbering of the calendar months, instead of being in their proper places, Sapta, Octa, Nova, and Deca (September, October, November, and December), are 2 places removed from their correct position.  

I believe that the Agure’s were associated with Aventine hill on which Remus lived and he was not chosen for kingship of Rome because of the presence of inauspicious birds.  Auspicious that is another word that I should add to the list, Shiva is known as the Auspicious one.  The birds were carrion birds, omens of death, and as we know the Aghori would sleep in grave yards and were obsessed with death and philosophy the death of delusion and ignorance.  

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Gymnosophists (Greek γυμνοσοφισταίgymnosophistai, i.e. “naked philosophers” or “naked sophists”)[1][2] is the name given by the Greeks to certain ancientIndian philosophers who pursued asceticism to the point of regarding food and clothing as detrimental to purity of thought (sadhus or yogis) and also even naked priests from Ethiopia.[2]  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gymnosophists

Remember if you will that the Gymnasium is where people were taught the philosophy or Greece and indoctrinated into society.  

A little more about Pythagorus:

 Aristippus explained his name by saying, “He spoke (agor-) the truth no less than did the Pythian (Pyth-),”

 

There is little direct evidence as to the kind and amount of knowledge which Pythagoras acquired, or as to his definite philosophical views. Everything of the kind mentioned by Plato and Aristotle is attributed not to Pythagoras, but to the Pythagoreans. Heraclitus stated that he was a man of extensive learning;[25] andXenophanes claimed that he believed in the transmigration of souls.[26] Xenophanes mentions the story of his interceding on behalf of a dog that was being beaten, professing to recognise in its cries the

voice of a departed friend.

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Pythagorean theorem

 a^2 + b^2 = c^2.

While the theorem that now bears his name was known and previously utilized by the Babylonians and Indians, he, or his students, are often said to have constructed the first proof. 

 

Tetractys

Pythagoras was also credited with devising the tetractys, the triangular figure of four rows which add up to the perfect number, ten. As a mystical symbol, it was very important to the worship of the Pythagoreans who would swear oaths by it:

And the inventions were so admirable, and so divinised by those who understood them, that the members used them as forms of oath: “By him who handed to our generation the tetractys, source of the roots of ever-flowing nature.”

—Iamblichus, Vit. Pyth., 29
 
Aristotle claimed that the philosophy of Plato closely followed the teachings of the Pythagoreans,[78] and Cicero repeats this claim: Platonem ferunt didicisse Pythagorea omnia (“They say Plato learned all things Pythagorean“) Bertrand Russell, in his A History of Western Philosophy, contended that the influence of Pythagoras on Plato and others was so great that he should be considered the most influential of all Western philosophers.
 
Pythagoras became the subject of elaborate legends surrounding his historic persona. Aristotle described Pythagoras as a wonder-worker and somewhat of a supernatural figure, attributing to him such aspects as a golden thigh, which was a sign of divinity. According to Muslim tradition, Pythagoras was said to have been initiated by Hermes (Egyptian Thoth).[55] According to accounts of Aristotle and others, some ancients believed that he had the ability to travel through space and time and to communicate with animals and plants.[56]
 

Influence on esoteric groups

Pythagoras started a secret society called the Pythagorean Brotherhood devoted to the study of mathematics. This had a great effect on future esoteric traditions, such as Freemasonry and Rosicrucianism, both of which were scientific/mystical groups dedicated to the study of mathematics/geometry and logical reasoning as opposed to religious dogma. Both Freemasonry and Rosicrucianism have claimed to have evolved out of the Pythagorean Brotherhood. 

jacob boehme tetractys…

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OC’s Favorite Occultist Musician Writes a Song About Gun Violence. Strange? Yes.

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http://blogs.ocweekly.com/heardmentality/2014/02/lon_milo_duquette_scared_new_song.php

The word “gun” comes at the end of OC-based folksinger Lon Milo DuQuette’s nearly three-minute new song, “I’m Scared.”

 

It comes after a series of things big and small that DuQuette, with tongue firmly in cheek, sings about being scared of: everything from mimes and clowns to homosexuals and intellectuals. And its placement elevates the song from quirky examination of individual fears to a critique of the collective hysteria that seems to drive so many people to protect themselves from their subjective shadows by carrying the one object that may actually inflate their substance.

DuQuette isn’t anti-gun. He grew up hunting in Nebraska, believes in the constitutionally guaranteed right of Americans to bear arms, and doesn’t believe that every member of the NRA is a delusional maniac.

But he is anti-fear. And while his song, which was released Jan. 24, has been heartily endorsed by the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence, has logged more than 1,000 hits onSoundcloud, held the top slot on the CD Baby Folk Chart this week (second overall) and he will even perform it at an upcoming event at SpiNYC in Manhattan, Hollywood bastion of liberalism and Susan Sarandon’s ping pong/live music venue, DuQuette hopes that any attention it receives focuses on the real message.

“It’s satirical all right,but I’m pretty serious about it,” he says. “The problem of gun violence in this country is insane. I travel to Europe a lot and I see how other cultures view this insanity. But the problem is more fundamental than having so many guns. The problem is this culture of fear.

“The fact that people feel the need to carry guns because they’re afraid all the time, that’s really a spiritual crime. Possessing an instrument of death literally changes one’s consciousness, turns you into a different person. I’ve seen it happen with friends and relatives. Carrying a gun around actually affects their consciousness and they turn into very scared and unhappy individuals.”

Now, if DuQuette was just another snot-nosed wannabe Billy Bragg with an acoustic guitar and no real life experience, it’d be very easy to write off his opinions and ideas. But considering that he’s one of the world’s most respected writers about the occult, hung out with Timothy Leary’s Laguna Beach-based Brotherhood of Eternal Love and started doing the folk-rock thing back in the mid-1960 (he opened up for Arlo Guthrie AND Sammy Davis, Jr.), his perspective is anything but mainstream and pedestrian.
He’s a wise dude who is convinced, just as the most zealous gun-rights advocate would be, that guns aren’t the problem, people are. Particularly people who somehow feel that a device manufactured with one purpose–to kill–is an antidote to all the things that scare them.

He says that those people who passionately believe that a disarmed populace under tyrannical rule is a problem have a well-taken point. But that notion, “still comes from a consciousness platform of fear,” he says. “And if that is the focus of your life, you’re missing out on a great deal. It’s not that there’s nothing to be afraid of, but if that’s going to be the primary focus of your life, you’ve already surrendered. And if fear is the reason you want to arm yourself, you’re probably the last person who needs to be armed for all of our safety.”

So, is DuQuette,who will tour China and 11 European countries this spring, scared of anything?

“No,” he says. “At least, not as much as I should be.”

To listen to the song gratis, go here and if you want to help out America’s favorite occultist/folk musician and actually buy it for 99 cents, go to Amazon.

My New Book

My New Book

Signed by Author as a gift from my friend.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lon Milo DuQuette
Born 11 July 1948
Long Beach, California, USA
Lon Milo DuQuette, also known as Rabbi Lamed Ben Clifford,[1] is an American writer, lecturer, musician, and occultist, best known as an author who applies humor in the field of Western Hermeticism.