Tag Archives: kali satdurgananda

Shaktipat Initiation of Fidem Turbāre

goddess-clouds-fidem-turbare

I have been contemplating this for a while and I feel that I must do this now.  Today I give Fidem Turbāre a new name.  I as a shaktipat guru have that ability.  I have realized that my words have power, people can ignore that power or they can argue that my words don’t have power but none of that prevents my words from having the power that they do indeed have.  This is not going to be her only name, it doesn’t require any change in her behavior.  What it does is it connects her with my guru lineage.  It grants her a type of authority.  It makes her part of a philosophical family, a philoish, that goes back to the beginning of civilization.  

Her guru lineage is now as follows, Myself Shivah Solomon, or Shivastus Solomonicus, ( I was given shaktipat initiation by Gurumayi Chidvilasananda, she never gave me a name, so I did not adopt the suffix ananda, my mission was to create a different order of monks, those of the blue robes, the Zed) my guru was Gurumayi Chidvilasananda, her guru was Baba Muktananda, his guru was Bhagawan Nityananda.  The name that I bequeath upon her is Kali Satdurgananda.  

Kālī (/ˈkɑːli/; Sanskrit: काली, IPA: [kɑːliː]), also known as Kālikā (Sanskrit: कालिका), is the Hindugoddess associated with empowerment, shakti. She is the fierce aspect of the goddess Durga (Parvati).[1] The name Kali comes from kāla, which means black, time, death, lord of death: Shiva. Since Shiva is called Kāla— the eternal time — the name of Kālī, his consort, also means “Time” or “Death” (as in “time has come”). Hence, Kāli is the Goddess of Time and Change. Although sometimes presented as dark and violent, her earliest incarnation as a figure of annihilation of evil forces still has some influence. Various Shakta Hindu cosmologies, as well as Shākta Tantric beliefs, worship her as the ultimate reality or Brahman. Comparatively recent devotional movements largely conceive Kāli as a benevolent mother goddess.[2] Kālī is represented as the consort of Lord Shiva, on whose body she is often seen standing. Shiva lies in the path of Kali, whose foot on Shiva subdues her anger.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kali

Sat (Sanskrit: सत्) is a Sanskrit adjective meaning “the ideal; pure and true essence (nature)” of an entity or existence in the Vedanta. It can thus be concluded as “the self-existent or Universal Spirit, Brahman“.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sat_(Sanskrit)

Durga (Hindustani pronunciation: [ˈd̪ʊrɡaː]; Sanskrit: दुर्गा), meaning “the inaccessible”[1] or “the invincible”, is the most popular incarnation of Devi and one of the main forms of the Goddess Shakti in the Hindu pantheon.[2] Durga is the original manifested form of Mother Adi-Parashakti. Durga is Adi-Parashakti herself. The Devi Gita, declares her to be the greatest Goddess. Thus, she is considered the supreme goddess and primary deity in Shaktism, occupying a place similar to Lord Krishna in Vaishnavism. According to Skanda Purana, the goddess Parvati accounted the name “Durga” after she killed the demon Durgamaasura. Goddess Parvati is considered to be the complete incarnation of Adi Parashakti or Goddess Durga, with all other goddesses being her incarnations or manifestations.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durga

Ānanda (Sanskrit: आनन्द) literally means bliss or happiness. In the HinduVedas, Upanishads and Bagavad gita, ānanda signifies eternal bliss which accompanies the ending of the rebirth cycle. Those who renounce the fruits of their actions and submit themselves completely to the divine will, arrive at the final termination of the cyclical life process (saṃsāra) to enjoy eternal bliss (ānanda) in perfect union with the godhead. The tradition of seeking union with God through passionate commitment is referred to as bhakti, or devotion.[1]

Furthermore, ānanda is an euphemism for sexual pleasure and orgasm.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C4%80nanda_(Hindu_philosophy)

When I was studying the philosophy of Siddha Yoga Baba Muktananda had named one of his disciples Durgananda, she was terrible, a waist of bandwidth.  She didn’t have anything to say and she had no light to kick, she was blocking the light in herself, I learned nothing from her.  I often wonder if it wasn’t a joke on the part of Muktananda to give her that name.  The word dirge actually comes from the sanskrit word durga, it was as though she just liked making this terrible sad monotone sound, I hated it.  Anyway, part of this name is to make a correction to that in naming Fidem Turbare as the true Durgananda.  

dirge is a somber song or lament expressing mourning or grief, such as would be appropriate for performance at a funeral. The English word dirge is derived from the LatinDirige, Domine, Deus meus, in conspectu tuo viam meam (“Direct my way in your sight, O Lord my God”), the first words of the first antiphon in the Matins of the Office for the Dead, created on basis of Ps. 5:9. The original meaning of dirge in English referred to this office.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirge

Anyway, I hope she appreciates it.  I think she will enjoy this photoshop I made a while back, I feel it has significance for her. mahavidya_chinnamasta_hh56