Tag Archives: MYTH

Quranism is a gateway to Salafi ism.

QURAN SALAFI

According to Kepel, Salafist jihadism combined “respect for the sacred texts in their most literal form, … with an absolute commitment to jihad, whose number-one target had to be America, perceived as the greatest enemy of the faith.”[4]

 but even more dangerous was theMuslim Brotherhood, who were believed by Salafi Jihadists to be excessively moderate and lacking in literal interpretation of holy texts.[4] Iyad El-Baghdadi describes Salafism as “deeply divided” into “mainstream (government-approved, or Islahi) Salafism”, and Jihadi Salafism.[3]

According to Mohammed M. Hafez, contemporary jihadi Salafism is characterized by “five features”:

  • immense emphasis on the concept of tawhid (unity of God);
  • God’s sovereignty (hakimiyyat Allah), which defines right and wrong, good and evil, and which supersedes human reasoning is applicable in all places on earth and at all times, and makes unnecessary and un-Islamic other ideologies such as liberalism or humanism;
  • the rejection of all innovation (Bid‘ah) to Islam;
  • the permissibility and necessity of takfir (the declaring of a Muslim to be outside the creed, so that they may face execution);
  • and on the centrality of jihad against infidel regimes.[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salafist_jihadism

hadithn

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Rabbi Ba’al Shivah: the Ancient Perspective on Water and Space.

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From the perspective of the ancient super genii, there was a connection between outer space and water on this planet, from the ancient perspective the material of outer space was identical to water.  Beings that came from outer space to teach humans often had different colored skin, most often blue.  This is why people had the superstition that you could sail off the end of the earth.

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 Osiris was associated with the Nile river, and the Milky way, which used to line up with one another and appeared to connect on the horizon, making the connection between outer space and earthly bodies of water that much more concrete.

Osiris was considered not only a merciful judge of the dead in the afterlife, but also the underworld agency that granted all life, including sprouting vegetation and the fertile flooding of the Nile River. He was described as the “Lord of love“,[7] “He Who is Permanently Benign and Youthful[8] and the “Lord of Silence”.[9] The Kings of Egypt were associated with Osiris in death — as Osiris rose from the dead they would, in union with him, inherit eternal life through a process of imitative magic. By the New Kingdom all people, not just pharaohs, were believed to be associated with Osiris at death, if they incurred the costs of the assimilation rituals.[10]

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SHIVA AND THE GANGES

Bhagiratha prayed to Brahma that Ganga come down to Earth. Brahma agreed, and he ordered Ganga to go down to the Earth and then on to the nether regions so that the souls of Bhagiratha’s ancestors would be able to go to heaven. Ganga felt that this was insulting and decided to sweep the whole Earth away as she fell from the heavens. Alarmed, Bhagiratha prayed to Shiva that he break up Ganga’s descent.

Gupta era terracotta of Ganga found at Ahichchhatra, UP now in National Museum, New Delhi.

Ganga arrogantly fell on Shiva’s head. But Shiva calmly trapped her in his hair and let her out in small streams. The touch of Shiva further sanctified Ganga. As Ganga travelled to the nether-worlds, she created a different stream to remain on Earth to help purify unfortunate souls there. She is the only river to follow from all the three worlds – Swarga (heaven), Prithvi (Earth) and, Patala (netherworld or hell). Thus is called “Tripathagā” (one who travels the three worlds) in Sanskrit language.

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The teachers of men were thought to have come from outer space, and are often represented as half man and half fish.  The biblical tradition of Jonah being swallowed by a big fish and then vomited on to dry land continues this metaphor.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2097616/Fortress-hill-Israel-Bibles-Jonah-supposedly-buried-dates-800BC.html

This metaphor didn’t end with Jonah, though, it was continued in the symbolism of the modern Roman Catholic Church.

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Dagon was originally an East Semitic Mesopotamian (AkkadianAssyrianBabylonian) fertility god who evolved into a major Northwest Semitic god, reportedly of grain (as symbol of fertility) and fish and/or fishing (as symbol of multiplying). He was worshipped by the early Amorites  -wikipedia

Oannes (Ὡάννης, Hovhannes [Հովհաննես] in Armenian) was the name given by the Babylonian writer Berossus in the 3rd century BCE to a mythical being who taught mankind wisdom. Berossus describes Oannes as having the body of a fish but underneath the figure of a man. He is described as dwelling in the Persian Gulf, and rising out of the waters in the daytime and furnishing mankind instruction in writing, the arts and the various sciences. Oannes and the Semitic god Dagon were considered identical.[3] -wikipedia

Adapa, the first of the Mesopotamian seven sages, was a mythical figure who unknowingly refused the gift of immortality.

Roles[edit]

Adapa was a mortal man from a godly lineage, a son of Ea (Enki in Sumerian), the god of wisdom and of the ancient city of Eridu, who brought the arts of civilization to that city (from Dilmun, according to some versions). He broke the wings of Ninlil the South Wind, who had overturned his fishing boat, and was called to account before Anu. Ea, his patron god, warned him to apologize humbly for his actions, but not to partake of food or drink while he was in heaven, as it would be the food of death. Anu, impressed by Adapa’s sincerity, offered instead the food of immortality, but Adapa heeded Ea’s advice, refused, and thus missed the chance for immortality that would have been his.

Vague parallels can be drawn to the story of Genesis, where Adam and Eve are expelled from the Garden of Eden by Yahweh, after they ate from the Tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thus gaining death.[2] Parallels are also apparent (to an even greater degree) with the story of Persephone visiting Hades, who was warned to take nothing from that kingdom. Stephanie Galley writes “From Erra and Ishum we know that all the sages were banished … because they angered the gods, and went back to the Apsu, where Ea lived, and … the story … ended with Adapa’s banishment” p. 182.

Adapa is often identified as advisor to the mythical first (antediluvian) king of EriduAlulim. In addition to his advisory duties, he served as a priest and exorcist, and upon his death took his place among the Seven Sages or Apkallū. (Apkallu, “sage”, comes from SumerianAB.GAL.LU (Ab=water, Gal=Great Lu=Man) a reference to Adapa, the first sage’s association with water.)

You will notice the similarity of sound between the words Dagon and Dragon and this is not an accident, I can assure you but I probably can’t prove it beyond a shadow of a doubt, you will have to rely on your own instincts.  Years ago when I was shown the similarity of meanings between words all over the world that had similar sounds I started making connections that were not obvious, I call this science/meditation philophonology.

Dragons are often held to have major spiritual significance in various religions and cultures around the world. In many Asian cultures dragons were, and in some cultures still are, revered as representative of the primal forces of nature, religion and the universe. They are associated with wisdom—often said to be wiser than humans—and longevity. They are commonly said to possess some form of magic or other supernatural power, and are often associated with wells, rain, and rivers. In some cultures, they are also said to be capable of human speech. In some traditions dragons are said to have taught humans to talk. -wikipedia

We are going to take a little segue now, and go in a slightly different direction, the connection has already been established between the half man half fish and the connection with the serpent, so lets move towards half man half snake continuing with this reptilian connection.

naga, ( Sanskrit: “serpent”) in Hinduism and Buddhism, a member of a class of semidivine beings, half human and half serpentine. They are considered to be a strong, handsome race who can assume either human or wholly serpentine form. They are regarded as being potentially dangerous but in some ways are superior to humans. They live in an underground kingdom called Naga-loka, or Patala-loka, which is filled with resplendent palaces, beautifully ornamented with precious gems. The creator deity Brahma is said to have relegated the nagas to the nether regions when they became too populous on earth and to have commanded them to bite only the truly evil or those destined to die prematurely. They are also associated with waters—rivers, lakes, seas, and wells—and are generally regarded as guardians of treasure. Three notable nagas are Shesha (or Ananta), who in the Hindu myth of creation is said to support Narayana (Vishnu) as he lies on the cosmic ocean and on whom the created world rests; Vasuki, who was used as a churning rope to churn the cosmic ocean of milk; and Takshaka, the tribal chief of the snakes. In modern Hinduism the birth of the serpents is celebrated on Naga-panchami in the month of Shravana (July–August).

The female nagas (or nagis), according to tradition, are serpent princesses of striking beauty, and the dynasties of Manipur in northeastern India, the Pallavas in southern India, and the ruling family of Funan (ancient Indochina) each claimed an origin in the union of a human being and a nagi.

In Buddhism, nagas are often represented as door guardians or, as in Tibet, as minor deities. The snake king Muchalinda, who sheltered the Buddha from rain for seven days while he was deep in meditation, is beautifully depicted in the 9th–13th century Mon-Khmer Buddhas of what are now Thailand and Cambodia. In Jainism, the Tirthankara (saviour) Parshvanatha is always shown with a canopy of snake hoods above his head.

In art, nagas are represented in a fully zoomorphic form, as hooded cobras but with from one to seven or more heads; as human beings with a many-hooded snake canopy over their heads; or as half human, with the lower part of their body below the navel coiled like a snake and a canopy of hoods over their heads. Often they are shown in postures of adoration as one of the major gods or heroes is shown accomplishing some miraculous feat before their eyes.

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/401527/naga

They forgot Siddha-loka, lol, 3:})

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Vlad the Impaler

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

During his life Vlad wrote his name in Latin documents as Wladislaus Dragwlya, vaivoda partium Transalpinarum (1475).[3]

His Romanian patronymic Dragwlya (or Dragkwlya)[3] Dragulea, Dragolea, Drăculea,[4][5] is a diminutive of the epithet Dracul carried by his fatherVlad II, who in 1431 was inducted as a member of the Order of the Dragon, a chivalric order founded by Sigismund of Hungary in 1408. Dracul is the Romanian definite form, the -ul being the suffixal definite article (deriving from Latin ille). The noun drac “dragon” itself continues Latin draco. Thus, Dracula literally means “Son of the Dragon”. In Modern Romanian, the word drac has adopted the meaning of “devil” (the term for “dragon” now being balaur or dragon). This has led to misinterpretations of Vlad’s epithet as characterizing him as “devilish”.

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The Latin motto of the City is “Domine dirige nos“, which translates as “Lord, direct (guide) us”. It appears to have been adopted in the 17th century, as the earliest record of it is was first recorded in 1633.

I actually disagree with the official translation of the coat of arms for London, I translate it differently, I also say it differently, Nos dominos, dirige.  The Dragons Rule us.  Nos = us, dominos = domain, kingdom, dominion, dirige = dragon.

 Dracul comes from the Romanian drac (“devil”), itself deriving from the Latin draco (“dragon”).

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Dracula

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OEDIPUS REX/TYRANNOUS AND SIGMOND FREUD

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Lynn:  Before we get started I would like to point out that this Greek piece of literature is usually translated as Oedipus Rex instead of Tyrannous the Latin root for tyrant because back in that time it didn’t have the connotation it has now.  The “tyrant” was the popular ruler, so tyrannous is probably the best translation although Rex is the most common.   The question that I have for you is why did Sigmund Freud choose to base his entire psychological system on a Greek play? 
 
Joxua:  To say that Oedipus Tyrannous is just a play doesn’t do it justice.  This play has deep insights into the human condition.  I am not like other scholars in thinking that we are wiser than the ancients if anything I feel that in some ways we are stupider when it comes to people and relationship.  Human beings are intelligent objects so we find that truths about humans and groups of humans are constantly changing and unreliable, what is true today is patently false tomorrow.  Much more intelligent patterns evolve from humans than through objects or unintelligent objects or phenomenon.  Today we are insulated from relationship just as we are distracted from it so our understanding of human nature and of ourselves has been diminished as it is not as useful to us as it was to the ancients.  Oedipus Rex is predictive and descriptive of patterns in human relationship.  
 
Lynn:  That is brilliant.  Could you deconstruct for us the symbolism in the play and the hidden subjects and meanings?  
 
Joxua:  I would love to.  To start with Oedipus is found to be unfit for survival, as was the Greek tradition he was left exposed to the elements on the side of a hill as part of a post natal abortion.  “Oedipus” probably means gimpy leg which is why he was left to die, he was malformed.  He was rescued and raised by a goat herd and one day for some reason he runs into his father, who tries to kill him and he accidentally kills his father not knowing that it is his father.  Athens is being cursed by the gods and the Queen offers a reward for anyone that can answer the riddle of the sphinx, Oedipus says why the fuck not, my life has not been great up to this moment, maybe I will win the lottery.  
 
The sphinx asks him 3 questions which he is curiously predisposed to answer because of his physical flaw.  The question is “What walks on all fours as a child, 2 legs in the prime of life, and 3 legs in old age?”  the answer is mankind, this also shows us that the play itself is about the plight of mankind.  So Oedipus saves the day and he is the cause of the good, the queen, his mom, now without a king has weakened influence over her kingdom and so she needs to marry someone that will make her rule more popular with the people.  Oedipus is the most popular man in the kingdom and so obviously she marries him and he has no better option than being king so he accepts.  He ends up having children with his mother and eventually Athens falls into disfavor with the gods again, and is again in need of being saved.  
 
Once again Oedipus sets out to see if he can save Athens from the disfavor of the gods and what he finds out is that HE is himself the cause of the plagues on Athens.  He killed his father which is called a blood crime and the furies existed to torment people who killed family members because that was one of the worst crimes imaginable.  Not to mention he had committed incest with his mother.  Of more interest was that everything he had done had been perfectly logical and he had no way of knowing at the time that he was doing something wrong, being self interested and wanting to survive and live a good life and accepting the best options that were available to him.  The entire thing was orchestrated by Providence, it was pre-ordained, and he was being blamed for it, punished for it, and not just him but all of Athens was being punished for his sins.  Whereas before he was the cause of the good, now he was the cause of the bad because he had been the cause of the good.  All he could do now to ameliorate the situation was to exile himself from his home, which he does but he also plucks out his eyes and wanders the earth sightless so he doesn’t have to observe the insanity of the human condition anymore.  
 
lynn:  Whoa, that is gnarley!